Ludmila Gayvoronsky

Portrait of Ludmila standing in front of one of her drawings.

In my recent works I would like to convey the concepts of solitude and happiness, sorrow and joy, depression and optimism. I want to show the impression and the idea of life as a gift to enjoy and to perfect ourselves, but also as a challenge to us to believe, to struggle, to help and to hope.

Something is askew in modern time and space, and that traditional symbols and myths have lost much of their original meaning. Any honest revival of the figurative tradition will arise not as return to images culled from the nineteenth-century Salons or the tired cliches of postmodernism, but rather from the soul and imagination of individual artists inspired by the formal and spiritual potentials of the human body and the world around us.

I never worried about what style I am painting, whether it’s Expressionism, Abstraction, or Realism. When you have the option of going from one extreme to the next, then you can consider yourself a master. I like to fuse the abstract and real connected by one feeling or imagery into one painting. My persistent goal is to say more with less. I strive for simplicity, so that I can express my feeling in a way that seems new to the viewer. Unless you crucify yourself on the piece of paper or canvas, nothing will be done. I want to convey a thought, or an attitude about what I am painting. This is a part which cannot be conveyed through slides, including the delicacy of colors. My paintings often feature secret symbols, hidden images, coded autobiographical references, and allegorical allusions. I don’t believe that “finished” is compatible with artistic quality and ambition. Only method-style work should be finished. No great artist ever finished a picture or a statue.

Art gives me a reason for existing. I have spent absolutely no time promoting myself and I suppose I have paid the penalty in terms of recognition. On the other hand, my work has had a chance to develop in quieter way without a lot of demands put upon it.

Q&A with Ruth Sterling

How would you describe your background?

I graduated Hydro-Meteorological Institute in Odessa and Postgraduated the World Meteorological Center in Moscow. Then, I attended the Art Studio of Moscow Scientist’s House and graduated the Sourikov`s Academy of Art in Moscow.

When did you know you wanted to be an artist?

My junior years in High School. When I worked as a climatologist at the Observatory in the city of Samara, my chief E.I. Yankovsky told me – “You better should move to St. Petersberg and enter Art Academy to study painting.”. Another sign was made to me by my friend when I was a postgraduate student in Moscow: “What are you going to do after making your PhD?”. My answer was – “I will drop everything and will start my Art education to become a professional Artist”.

What would surprise people to learn about you?

At the same time I was involved in gymnastics (3rd category ) and Rhythmic gymnastics (1st category).

How would you describe your art to someone who has never seen it?

My artwork encompasses genres ranging from expressionistic to surreal. My portfolio incorporates dreamlike, elusive mysterious qualities, which combines the past with imaginative mythical or allegorical settings, fusing the abstract and the real into my own style. In my works I utilize classical art forms and images and transform them into contemporary vision. I am building my own world of images which are fantastic, romantic, and mystical. I never worried about what style I am painting, whether it’s Expressionism, Abstraction, or Realism. I like to fuse the abstract and real connected by one feeling or imagery into one painting. My paintings often feature secret symbols, hidden images, coded autobiographical references, and allegorical allusions. My persistent goal is to say more with less.

What achievements in the area of art are you proudest of?

I was a winner of gold medal at Moscow Festival of Arts and Special recognition of the Spring`s Art competition in Moscow.

I was given a Certificate of Appreciation in Recognition of Notable Services from the United States Coast Guard at Governor’s Island, NY in May of 1985; received a Medal of Honor at the exhibit “The Centennial of Statue of Liberty” in NYC in April of 1986. I was nominated as the International Woman of the Year for the 1997/1998 in July of 1998 and was given the XXth Century Award for achievement in September of 1998 – both from the International Biographical Centre, Cambridge, England. Appointed as the Corresponding Academician in Arts by the Accademia Internazionale del Verbano in Vercelli, Italy in July of 1998, in 1999 Academical Knight by the same academy. Received the “American Medal of Honor” from Biographical Institute in 2003, and the Diploma Di Meritol and Medal, Casa Editrice Alba, Ferrara, Italy in 2005. Featured in Encyclopedia of American Living Artists, Who is Who in International Art, Who’s Who in America, New York Art Review, and many local newspapers.

How would you describe your art process?

A good day is one when a I spend a few hours in the morning to draw or paint in my home studio. I newer work with artificial light or on cloudy and dark days.

What is your usual studio/working day like?

The most delightful part of my life is visiting exhibitions and receptions. In summer time I like to swim in the near waterfall and lakes.

What is the most delightful part of your life outside of work?

The most delightful part of my life is visiting exhibitions and receptions. In summer time I like to swim in the near waterfall and lakes.